OTHER MERRIAM-WEBSTER DICTIONARIES

Loyalty Definition And More From The Free Merriam Webster Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Dictionary and Thesaurus, Newest Edition (c) 2014

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  • Obviously the answer is no (I painstakingly ), but public opinion isn’t always on the right side of history, and neither was Merriam-Webster dictionary earlier this year when . In this case, however, America nailed it: 57 percent of those polled said that no, a hot dog is not a sandwich, while 33 percent said it was, an 10 percent remained undecided.

    One of the lesser known of Indiana’s natural features is also one of the most uncommon. There are few examples of a true barrens community still remaining in our state. The dictionary has only a few unflattering words to say about such an area. The Merriam-Webster Dictionary states a barren site is “sterile unfruitful and unproductive location that lacks interest or charm.”

  • The free version of the Miriam Webster Dictionary has ads but which are minimally distracting however provide a link to the advertisement which may be problematic for some students. As a free app, this is an invaluable and accessible tool for individuals with LD especially accessible with Wi-Fi services.

    Merriam-Webster dictionary is now in the palm of your hand, searching has never been easier, either by typing or speaking what you’re looking for, and if you don’t know how to pronounce the word, the app can pronounce it for you.

    Websters Dictionary - Marijuana

       

    WEBSTER'S ENCYCLOPEDIC DICTIONARY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE Copyright 1957 - H.S. STUTTMAN Co.

    (from page 2681) marijuana or marihuana (ma re hwa na) n. A weed or herb, growing in many parts of North America; the dried leaves of the plant, which have narcotic qualities when smoked in cigarettes; sometimes called the assassin of youth.

    Marijuana, or Hashish, a subtle, crazing drug which is being surreptitiously sold in U.S. in the form of cigarettes. Narcotic officials named it 'The Assassin of Youth,' and state that it is as dangerous as a coiled rattlesnake. Its effects when smoked vary with different Individuals. It may make of its victim a philosopher, a joyous reveler, a mad insensate, or a fiendish murderer. Its purveyors whisper into the ears of Am. youth the wonders of a new cigarette with a real thrill, and without harmful effects. Students are lured to its use by promises of resultant keenness of mind, the easy solving of problems, an aid in exams. An addict was hanged in Baltimore in 1937 for a criminal assault on a ten-year-old girl. In Fla. a crazed youth killed his father, mother, two brothers, and a sister. In more than 30 cases of murder or degenerate sex crimes in 1937, marijuana proved to be a contributing cause. See Hashish.

    (page 1976) HEMP (hemp) n. 1 A tough-fiberded plant from which rope and certain coarse fabrics are made. 2. Hashish, a narcotic and intoxicating drug obtained from the Indian hemp. 3. Slang. The rope used for hanging people. Hemp'en adj.

    Hemp, commercial name for the textile fibers yielded by several unrelated plants, but strictly used only to describe those produced by Cannabis sativa, native to s. Russ., Per., and parts of China. This plant is characterized by a straight undivided stalk, usually from five to eight ft. high, but sometimes attaining a height of 18 ft. The best hemp comes from Italy; it is also cultivated in Russ., the Philippines and elsewhere. It is mostly used in the mfr. of rope and strong twine, and is woven into sail-cloth and fire-hose. For making canvas and sacking it has been largely replaced by jute, which is cheaper. The Arabs give the name hashish to a preparation of the leaves. Hemp also has useful medicinal properties.

     

  • Websters Dictionary - Marijuana

       

    WEBSTER'S ENCYCLOPEDIC DICTIONARY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE Copyright 1957 - H.S. STUTTMAN Co.

    (from page 2681) marijuana or marihuana (ma re hwa na) n. A weed or herb, growing in many parts of North America; the dried leaves of the plant, which have narcotic qualities when smoked in cigarettes; sometimes called the assassin of youth.

    Marijuana, or Hashish, a subtle, crazing drug which is being surreptitiously sold in U.S. in the form of cigarettes. Narcotic officials named it 'The Assassin of Youth,' and state that it is as dangerous as a coiled rattlesnake. Its effects when smoked vary with different Individuals. It may make of its victim a philosopher, a joyous reveler, a mad insensate, or a fiendish murderer. Its purveyors whisper into the ears of Am. youth the wonders of a new cigarette with a real thrill, and without harmful effects. Students are lured to its use by promises of resultant keenness of mind, the easy solving of problems, an aid in exams. An addict was hanged in Baltimore in 1937 for a criminal assault on a ten-year-old girl. In Fla. a crazed youth killed his father, mother, two brothers, and a sister. In more than 30 cases of murder or degenerate sex crimes in 1937, marijuana proved to be a contributing cause. See Hashish.

    (page 1976) HEMP (hemp) n. 1 A tough-fiberded plant from which rope and certain coarse fabrics are made. 2. Hashish, a narcotic and intoxicating drug obtained from the Indian hemp. 3. Slang. The rope used for hanging people. Hemp'en adj.

    Hemp, commercial name for the textile fibers yielded by several unrelated plants, but strictly used only to describe those produced by Cannabis sativa, native to s. Russ., Per., and parts of China. This plant is characterized by a straight undivided stalk, usually from five to eight ft. high, but sometimes attaining a height of 18 ft. The best hemp comes from Italy; it is also cultivated in Russ., the Philippines and elsewhere. It is mostly used in the mfr. of rope and strong twine, and is woven into sail-cloth and fire-hose. For making canvas and sacking it has been largely replaced by jute, which is cheaper. The Arabs give the name hashish to a preparation of the leaves. Hemp also has useful medicinal properties.

     

    Although Merriam Webster Dictionary does not provide text to speech of the definition, nor does the Speak Selection function in the app, if you turn on Triple-click Home -Voice Over function on, you will have text to speech of the text definition with triple clicking. This takes a little bit of practice but is a very useful function for struggling readers for with many apps.

Merriam-Webster Visual Dictionary Online

According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, “elegance” is “refined grace or dignified propriety … tasteful richness of design or ornamentation … dignified gracefulness or restrained beauty of style … neatness, and simplicity.”