Meet The Feebles - 35mm print ready to go

Bogen W. A. 24x36 40mm F/3.5 Enlarging Lens - Big 35mm prints On Short Enlargers

Jumbl 22MP All-In-1 Film & Slide Scanner w/ Speed-Load Adapters for 35mm Negative & Slides, 110, 126, & Super 8 Films

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  • Review
  • TAG : 35mm restored print courtesy of the Outfest UCLA Legacy Project.
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    The controversial winner of the 1960 Cannes Jury Prize returns in a stunning new 35mm print — and the existential riddles of modern existence never looked better. In the indifferent world of L’;Avventura, when a woman goes missing, Michelangleo Antonioni (director of Blow Up, Zabriskie Point, The Passenger and La Notte) dares to ponder: “So what?” A highly intellectualized meditation on impermanence, and the film that catapulted Antonioni and lover/star Monica Vitti to international arthouse superstardom, L’Avventura rewrote film grammar and shattered accepted conventions of plot and character with its deft depiction of ennui among the idle rich. Gasp as cinematographer Aldo Scavarda takes you to film school in under three hours. Swoon for the early feminist bombshells of Italia. Thrill as they look for meaning across breathtaking island vistas and cavernous, lavishly adorned mansions. Wonder what the hell it all means, joining a cinephile tradition of over half a century! A richly rewarding rite of movie passage, L’Avventura has lost none of its power to challenge and inspire.
    Dir. Michelangelo Antonioni, 1960, 35mm, 143 min.

    Coming back to references and their importance: guidelines/references such as 35mm answer prints are key with regard to the final color process applied shot for shot and give access to what the film was supposed to look like; it is the foundation of our work, if you will, since from a (OC or I) Negative or IP any number of alterations can be made and were made - which has caused this confusion in the first place. Re: RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK: Pretty much "the same picture" as with T1: close (to the original mostly), but not 100% perfect; but compared to everything before on video masters A HUGE LEAP forward. Everyone who ownes an LPP of the re-issue will know. As for THE TERMINATOR: it was during its first run DeLuxe; if well cared for (storage at low and constant humidity and temperatures) many of these should still be in good enough condition to be of help (again, those MADE for reference, not theatrical usage). Theatrical prints - since they vary quite a bit due to the "speedy production process", too much to be reliable - merely give an indication, nothing more. The grabs posted of the European 1.66 masked print fall under that category, not least due to the one-light scan without proper color and light timing when transferred to video. In their present condition (digitally) these are not of real help. But as I have said before, the new (BD) master is, indeed, A VAST IMPROVEMENT over the T1 endevours of the last decades, regardless of the format.

  • What's not clear to me is does a DeLuxe 35mm print exist and is it not possible to translate that same colour palette to BD? Not arguing with any points you made, but why does a sci-fi film about killer robots form the future have to "look natural"? The whole thing is fantasy and heavily stylized... the whole "natural" argument gets used so often, yet there's honestly no real reason why this film in particular — or any film, really — should need to look realistic. It's placing you in a fictitious world — and in a fictitious world, whatever the filmmaker shows you is given to be truth. So, in this world, people look sorta teal.

    Since the initial 1986 gift, The Museum of Modern Art has added 35mm prints of (1987), (1989), (1995), (1997), (1999), (2002), and (2006) to the film collection. Each new print is delivered to MoMA from the Pinewood Studios offices of Eon Productions once the next production begins. For example, a new 35mm print of Marc Forster’s arrived at MoMA when production of the newest film, temporarily titled Bond 23 and set to be released in November 2012, began production. In early May the Museum’s film acquisition committee will meet and decide if Quantum of Solace is an appropriate addition to the collection; I have a feeling, given the previous 21 Bond films in the collection and this newest film’s great merits, it will be a relatively quick vote.

    Originally Posted by Canuck21
    Thank you so much for cleaing this up. I would feel less frustrated if the studios would explain their authoring decision as an extra like you just did. What I don't like with the spreading (globally) of the teal push is that it affects skin tone which often looks off and I guess sometime the effect is overdone. Your DeLuxe example looks so much more natural.

    What's not clear to me is does a DeLuxe 35mm print exist and is it not possible to translate that same colour palette to BD?

  • Originally Posted by Canuck21
    Thank you so much for cleaing this up. I would feel less frustrated if the studios would explain their authoring decision as an extra like you just did. What I don't like with the spreading (globally) of the teal push is that it affects skin tone which often looks off and I guess sometime the effect is overdone. Your DeLuxe example looks so much more natural.

    What's not clear to me is does a DeLuxe 35mm print exist and is it not possible to translate that same colour palette to BD?

    Dalet is looking for small faults which might be hidden between the frames: washed out colours, scratches, badly glued film tears or missing subtitles. His job is to examine all the 16mm and 35mm celluloid prints selected for the festival, making sure the copies are in good condition and ready for screening.

Yay! You're now following 35mm print in your .

On June 1, 1986, MoMA celebrated the 25th anniversary of the sensational series with a gallery exhibition and film series titled 25 Years of James Bond: Gift of Albert R. Broccoli. Producer Broccoli, known as “Cubby” in the film industry, had just donated to MoMA new 35mm prints of (1962), (1963), (1964), (1965), (1967), (1969), (1971), (1973), (1974), (1977), (1979), (1981), (1983), and (1985). Further, Mr. Broccoli arranged for a long-term gift to MoMA consisting of a new 35mm print of each future Bond film yet to be produced. This remarkable and incredibly generous gift ensures that MoMA will continue to be the archival repository of all James Bond films produced by Eon Productions.