At this stage S-100 computers were becoming quite sophisticated

$100 Computers in Africa | WhiteAfrican

Logitech M100 USB Optical Wired Mouse 910-001601 (Black)

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  • A list with 100 computers, smartphones, printers, cloud services, and other great products inexorably emerges over the course of a few weeks. But that’s only half the battle, because the editors must now decide the order of importance that each product holds. That came together surprisingly quickly this year—at least for the top 10 products. As for the other 90; well, let’s just say the list was settled only after great deliberation.

    Do you want a dive computer that can do it all, yet is available in a compact configuration? Look no further than Oceanic's Veo 100 dive computer. Its large digits means reading the computer's information is incredibly easy - making it ideal for divers of all age groups. The Veo offers large, easy to read alphanumeric displays and color coded graphs where green means "go", yellow means "caution" and red means "stop". The Veo 100 is an economical and easy to use wrist mounted computer with state of the art features. All of its functions are easily accessed by pressing just one button. Compact and lightweight, the Veo 100 is a breeze to pack and carry anywhere

    The computer can be turned on before your dive, but if you forget to do this, it activates itself on when it goes underwater. The Oceanic Veo 100 uses as Modified Haldanean DSAT Rogers/Powell Data Based Algorithm for calculating your dive information. The computer has a maximum depth display to 399' (120 meters) and is fully altitude adjustable up to 14,000' (4,267 meters) of elevation. Computer can be used in two modes of Air or Gauge and has a 12-dive on-board log function. The Veo 100 Computer displays time, date and temperature, can be set for a 12 or 24 hour time format and can be set for imperial or metric units of measurements. The computer is powered by a user replaceable 3-Volt CR2450 lithium battery, has a lifetime of 300 hours and can be hot swapped without the loss of data. The computer displays current depth, maximum depth, no decompression time remaining, nitrogen loading has a variable ascent rate function, low battery warning, flashing safety stop icon and 3 minute timer, time to fly and nitrogen off-gas countdown. Computer comes with a comprehensive owner's manual. This item is available for sale to the US & Caribbean only.






    The Oceanic "Veo 100" Wrist Dive Computer, Yellow is commonly used for Cold Water, Extreme Depths, Recreation, Warm Water and more. The Oceanic "Veo 100" Wrist Dive Computer, Yellow is most used by customers who consider themselves to be a Advanced, Advanced Diver, Beginner, Casual/ Recreational, Professional, Recreational Diver among others. The Oceanic "Veo 100" Wrist Dive Computer, Yellow is popular because customers like the following qualities of the Oceanic "Veo 100" Wrist Dive Computer, Yellow: Easy To Operate, Easy To Read, Lots Of Functions, Reliable.

  • I am very interested in writing a grant to fund these $100 computers for a population of students living in rural Alabama, City of Detroit, and a Village in Ghana. I would like to establish a “Village to Village Literacy Networking” project. Do you know of any resources?
    Agnes Helen Bellel, Ph.D.

    I am very interested in writing a grant to fund these $100 computers for a population of students living in rural Alabama, City of Detroit, and a Village in Ghana. I would like to establish a “Village to Village Literacy Networking” project. Do you know of any resources?
    Agnes Helen Bellel, Ph.D.

    Club 100 in the News
    27-Feb-2002 San Jose Mercury News
    15-Feb-2002 San Francisco Chronicle
    01-Feb-2002 The Seattle Times
    09-Aug-2001 TechTV Broadcast and Web Article
    04-Jul-2001 San Francisco Chronicle
    March 2000 Wired Magazine
    Fall 1998 Invention & Technology Magazine
    CyberLife Television Segment
    Stories with Photos
    The Club 100 Warehouse
    Model 100 reconditioning process
    The Club 100 Computer Lab
    The Club 100 Model "T"s ... computers and car!
    We called it our monthly computer meeting
    Club 100 at the Computer Show
    The 2nd Decade Commitment (1993 to 2003)
    Rick Hanson & family

    • 1921: - Radio Shack begins as a one-store retail and mail-order company catering to ham operators and electronics buffs.
    • 1963: - Charles Tandy buys the chain of stores, and within two years turned a $4 million dollar loss into a $20 million dollar profit.
    • 1977: August - Radio Shack announces the TRS-80 Model I microcomputer for US$600.
    • 1977: September - One month after launching the TRS-80, 10,000 are sold.
    • 1979: May - Tandy/Radio Shack announces the TRS-80 Model II.
    • 1979: October - Radio Shack begins shipping the TRS-80 Model II to users.
    • 1980: July - Radio Shack introduces the TRS-80 Model III, priced from US$700 to US$2500.
    • 1980: July - Radio Shack introduces the TRS-80 Color Computer, and sells for US$400.
    • 1980: July - Radio Shack introduces the TRS-80 Pocket Computer. Price is US$230.
    • 1981: January - Radio Shack ceases production of the TRS-80 Model I, and recalls units from the US market, due to failure to meet new FCC radio-frequency interference regulations.
    • 1982: January - Radio Shack introduces the TRS-80 Model 16, with 8-inch floppy drives, and optional 8-MB hard drive.
    • 1982: January - Radio Shack introduces the TRS-80 Pocket Computer, Model PC-2, for US$280.
    • 1983: March - Radio Shack announces its TRS-80 Model 100 portable computer. Price is US$799 for 8KB version, to US$1134 for the 32KB version.
    • 1983: May - Radio Shack introduces the TRS-80 Model 4, for US$2000.
    • 1983: October - Tandy/Radio Shack announces the "transportable" TRS-80 Model 4P, for US$1800.
    • 1983: Radio Shack introduces the TRS-80 Pocket Computer, Model PC-4, replacing the PC-1, for US$70.
    • 1983: Tandy releases the TRS-80 Model 2000, which uses the Intel 80186 microprocessor.
    • 1983: Radio Shack unveils the TRS-80 Model 12 at the CP/M '83 Show. Price is US$3200.
    • 1985: March - Radio Shack introduces the Tandy 6000 multiuser system. It features Z80A and 68000 processors, 512 KB RAM, 80x24 text, graphics, 1.2-MB 8-inch disk, optional 15 MB hard drive, TRS-DOS, or XENIX 3.0. It supports up to 9 users.
      Source: Chronology of Events in the History of Microcomputers

    Previous attempts by the OLPC to provide children in developing nations sub-$100 computers hit various snags and holdups -- will the OLPC be able to succeed this time?Call Me Ishmael

Vector Graphic, Vector-1: Vintage S-100 Computer

I began to think of and how he has designed it to use very little energy so that students can self-power it. I heard him speak at NECC in San Diego and his passion for helping students around the world impressed me. A few years ago, my family went to a resort in a Latin American country and I visited a local school that did not have any electricity. The school did not have walls or windows. The school was the shaded area under a large tree. The teacher had a chalkboard that he lugged from his distant home. There were no textbooks or print resources for these students. If those students had the $100 computers, they could learn so much more and better their future life.